Trainer Peter Moody opens up on the perils of a most difficult profession   Leave a comment

Trainer Peter Moody opens up on the perils of a most difficult profession

CLICK HERE: MOODY VOWS TO BEAT COBALT CHARGE

Peter Moody made some interesting points about the life of a horse trainer in a scattergu

Peter Moody made some interesting points about the life of a horse trainer in a scattergun interview on Friday. Picture: Norm Oorloff Source: News Corp Australia

ONE day, whether forced out by the decision of some board or court or because he’s had a gutful, Peter Moody will lock the stable gate for the last time.

He will wonder about this career, of professional horse trainer, that seems littered with so many traps and pot holes.

Other trainers, broke, tired and depressed, are wondering the same sort of things. Some met the Herald Sun at a South Melbourne hotel three years ago, saying they were riddled with debt because owners wouldn’t pay. Moody is perceived as rich but says upcoming legal fees will crush him.

Tough gig: Peter Moody. Picture: Norm Oorloff

Tough gig: Peter Moody. Picture: Norm Oorloff Source:News Corp Australia

Other successful trainers have spoken of depression, no doubt in part caused by the pressure and Groundhog Day grind of their careers.

Whether Moody is guilty or not of administering cobalt to Lidari, he made some interesting points about the life of a horse trainer in a scattergun interview on Friday.

He opened the stable door, revealing perils of a profession that seems Dickensian in its time and work practices and a tight rope walk in its potential for accidents — “negligence’’ — that can crush dedicated careers.

Some may well be now looking sideways at Moody, as he revealed on Friday, but the same colleagues would understand his frustrations.

Australia’s zero tolerance to drugs in racing casts a wide net. For every proven cheat there are dozens caught out by rules of what Moody calls a “nanny state”.

Failure to notify authorities of mud or ice packs or hoof oils on these delicate racing machines can carry fines.

Some trainers, up since 3am, arrive at the stables to up to 100 horses that require individual treatments that are innocuous in themselves but illegal under race-day treatment rules.

Trainers use many treatments under the advice of vets who are guided by the “White Book,’’ which detailed, rather guessed, exit times for certain drugs.

That advice has caught out hundreds of trainers; the book says X is out of the horse’s system within eight days but irregularities to things like Bute and Ibuprofen are picked up 12 days out. Nearly every trainer has such a story.

Trainer Peter Moody says he is nervous every time one of his horses is saddled up for a r

Trainer Peter Moody says he is nervous every time one of his horses is saddled up for a race. Picture: Getty ImagesSource: Getty Images

Some reckon the testing equipment has become super sensitive, picking up micro-traces of a substance last used, legally, weeks before.

Moody said 200 people had access to his stables including a “salt of the earth’’ employee who mixes 100 horse feeds at 3.30am each day. Some required top-ups of this and that, others couldn’t because it might throw up a race-day positive. He says Lidari was treated with a hoof powder that he didn’t realise, until too late, contained concentrated cobalt.

Peter Moody with his mighty mare Black Caviar.

Peter Moody with his mighty mare Black Caviar. Source: News Limited

He said he would have to put each horse in a “steel box 48 hours out from a race’’ to be sure that none broke a drug rule within a swirling stable environment that will always have the potential for human error.

Moody said he was nervous every time one of his horses was saddled up for a race because he couldn’t be absolutely sure nothing had gone wrong.

“We’re only human. I’d have to employ a team of professors to be absolutely sure,’’ he said.

A female trainer, up since 3am and reprimanded for some minor error, was so upset recently she said she felt like driving into a tree. Another cut up rough over a sandwich because he too had been up for hours and had dragged two slow ones to Donald the previous day.

Moody recently took a month off, briefly shed his woes and his clothes, and swum naked near Gallipoli.

It must have felt good, must have given him a glimpse of an alternative life.

Peter Moody says it's a tough game with the swirling stable environment always having the

Peter Moody says it’s a tough game with the swirling stable environment always having the potential for human error. Picture: Mark Evans Source: News Corp Australia

Originally published as A job with trap doors at every turn

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Posted July 18, 2015 by belesprit09 in Uncategorized

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