Expert advice sought on ice case   Leave a comment

Expert advice sought on ice case

The Mornington trainer believes the positive result was caused by cross-contamination involving a staff member.

Mornington trainer Matt Laurie believes the positive result was caused by cross-contamina

Mornington trainer Matt Laurie believes the positive result was caused by cross-contamination involving a staff member. (None of the horses pictured are involved) Picture: Getty Images Source: Getty Images

RACING Victoria stewards are seeking expert advice on ice cross-contamination before taking further steps in the Matt Laurie case.

Laurie’s galloper Shockaholic is the first Victorian runner to test positive to methamphetamines, doing so after winning a 1100m maiden at Echuca in April.

At this stage it is still to be ascertained if the drug can be transmitted from human to horse via passive smoke, sweat or even urine.

“That’s what we are trying to find out — if it comes out through their skin, when they are putting bridles on, bits in their mouths. We are still learning about that ourselves,” Racing Victoria chief steward Terry Bailey said.

Bailey said they were speaking to pharmacologists and other experts.

“In fairness to Mr Laurie, we believe that is something we should pursue and investigate,” he said.

Ice use is fast casting a shadow over racing, with Tasmanian jockey Troy Baker banned for a year on Thursday after testing positive in May.

It was his second breach of the rule.

NSW trainer Luke Griffith was disqualified for four years in May after three horses in his care raced with ice in their system.

Trainer David Hayes regularly drug tests staff at his Lindsay Park facility.

Trainer David Hayes regularly drug tests staff at his Lindsay Park facility. Source: News Corp Australia

The Scone inquiry heard Griffith also tested positive to a substance believed to be methamphetamine.

Co-trainers David Hayes and Tom Dabernig regularly drug test staff at their Lindsay Park facility.

Hayes said he was paranoid about cross-contamination, and believed it could happen if a drug-using staff member urinated in a horse’s box.

“If the horse happens to lick the urination, I think that’s how it would get passed on to a horse,” he said.

Hayes said it was hard to believe a trainer would intentionally feed a horse ice.

“It is beyond comprehension for me,” he said.

“I suppose it makes people crazy and a bit stronger, but a crazy horse generally isn’t effective.”

After Shockaholic’s positive test, Laurie released a statement saying there was no reason to believe the racing industry was isolated from the prevalence of drug use in the community generally.

Originally published as Expert advice sought on ice case

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Posted July 10, 2015 by belesprit09 in Uncategorized

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