Danehill products dominate from coast to coast   Leave a comment

Danehill products dominate from coast to coast

Nine-time champion Australian stallion Danehill doesn’t need any further proof of his status as the golden thread in the nation’s thoroughbred fabric.

The Danehill wave hit tsunami-like proportions on Saturday when sons and grandsons of the Danzig stallion virtually blitzed the black type program across the country.

In Perth, the Al Maher filly Delicacy upstaged the males in the Group II $400,000 WA Derby (2400m), with Danehill-line sired Keysbrook and Boom Time in the minor placings.

At the same Ascot meeting, the filly Show Chloe, from the first crop of Alfred Nobel, a grandson of Danehill, romped to a near five-length win in the Group III $200,000 Sires’ Produce Stakes (1400m).

At Morphettville, the Group III $115,000 South Australian Sires’ Produce Stakes (1400m) fell to The Grey Flash, a filly by Not A Single Doubt, another great grandson of Danehill.

But it was at Randwick’s multi-million dollar autumn meeting where the Danehill dynasty fired up with a winning presence in seven of the eight Group I races run over the first two days of a traditional three-day program — and with the real possibility of adding the remaining two Group Is next Saturday.

High points for Danehill at Randwick have been the Group I $2 million Australian Derby (2400m), Group I $1m Australian Oaks (2400m) and Group I $1.6m Sydney Cup (3200m) won by progeny of his Group I winning sons Holy Roman Emperor, Darci Brahma and Dansili, respectively.

Danehill died at 17 after a ­paddock accident on the Coolmore Stud in Ireland in May, 2003. With advancing age, his Aust­ralian ­travels ceased after 2001, his 12th season in Australia. From a dual hemisphere career that is unlikely to be bettered, Danehill is credited with an extraordinary 349 stakeswinners worldwide and a record 89 Group I winners.

In addition to his record nine sires’ crowns, four of his sire-sons have been Australian champions in six of the past nine seasons. Danehill was also champion three times for Britain-Ireland and twice in France — and leading sire of two-year-olds in all three regions several times as well as claiming multiple broodmare sire titles.

Danehill had one winner of the Group I Australian Oaks (2400m) in Danendri but now features as the grandsire of four of the past five winners, with Darci Brahma’s daughter Gust Of Wind the newest addition on Saturday.

Holy Roman Emperor, the sire of Mongolian Khan, was one of five Group I winners in Danehill’s final foal crop of 2004 in Ireland while Darci Brahma, born in 2002, was the last of the stallion’s 47 Australian-conceived Group I winners.

Gust Of Wind became the first Group I winner in Australia for New Zealand-based Darci Brahma whose stock are popular at home but have had little attraction in Australia, given the profuse variety of sons and grandsons at stud here.

British-bred Grand Marshal on Saturday became the fourth imported Sydney Cup winner of the past five years and the latest on a long list of feature race winners of tried horses from Europe joining the stables of Sydney trainer Chris Waller.

Grand Marshal is by Dansili, the best sire-son of Danehill at stud in England, and sire also of the Waller-trained Foreteller, an ex-European runner who has won three Group Is in Australia.

Randwick wins for the filly Ottoman in the Group III $500,000 Percy Sykes Stakes (1200m) and the colt Furnaces in the Group III $200,000 Kindergarten Stakes (1100m) might have wrapped up the two-year-old sires’ premiership for the season for Exceed And Excel, son of Danehill.

Advertisements

Posted April 13, 2015 by belesprit09 in Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: